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Complete Guide to The Best Things to Do in Sintra

Complete Guide to The Best Things to Do in Sintra

There are so many things to do in Sintra, a day trip to Sintra is one of the most popular trips from Lisbon. Recognized  as a UNESCO Cultural Heritage Site since 1995, the town draws thousands of visitors throughout the year. Sintra first became popular with Portuguese royalty after Lisbon became the country’s capital in 1256. Portuguese kings and nobles built summer palaces and villas in the countryside west of the city and on the cool green heights of  Serra da Sintra. This has resulted in the construction of a number of quirky, spectacular palaces. In addition to all this royalty Sintra is also located near Cabo da Rocha, the westernmost point in continental Europe.

With so many things to do in Sintra it is important to make a list of what you’d like to see. Our insider tips will help you get the most out of your trip.

How to Get to Sintra

The easiest way to get to Sintra from Lisbon is to take the 45 minute train journey from Rossio train station in the city centre, you can buy a return train ticket at the station for €4.50.  The 434 bus connects Sintra train station to  the Moorish Castle and  palace of Pena. This is the best and cheapest way to explore Sintra as the walk to the palace and castle is up a very steep hill. After leaving the train station turn right and look for the correct bus you’ll recognise it by the long queue. One of the most confusing aspects of the whole process is the cost. The buses advertise 24 hour hop-on-hop-off  for €15 . However, that price is for all buses. If you are only interested in the round trip for the 434, the price is €6.90.

The current route for the 434 is the Moorish Castle, followed by palace of Pena, and Sintra Palace/ Sintra town centre, followed by Sintra train station. The buses gets crowded quickly they also empty quite a bit at every stop. While buses are supposed to leave the station every 15 minutes don’t expect to see a bus that often. The roads in Sintra are narrow and only allow one-way traffic. So you need to have lots of patience.

The 435 connects the station to Quinta da Reguleira and the palace of Monserrate. We walked from the train station to Monserrate Palace and it took over an hour and a half.  Not a walk we’d recommend, it’s a main road and there are no footpaths.

If you are driving to Sintra be warned that the roads are not designed for today’s traffic and it is almost impossible to find a parking place.

 

Palace and Park of Pena/ Parque e Palácio Nacional  da Pena

It is the most popular attraction in Sintra. The spectacular palace of Pena stands on the highest peaks of Serra de Sintra. Built in the 19th century as the dream summer palace of Dom  Ferdinand II,  known in Portugal as the ‘artist’ king. You’ll find an eclectic mix of architectural styles inspired by European Romanticism. With the declaration of the Republic in 191o, the palace became a museum preserved as it was when the royal family lived there. The brightly painted pink and yellow palace can be seen for miles around.

A huge park surrounds the palace, and hidden among the foliage are gazebos, fountains and a chalet built by Fernando II for his second wife the Countess of Edla. You can walk from the palace of Pena to the Moorish castle and visa versa. It is a pleasant walk through the woods and takes about 30 minutes.

 

RELATED:Exactly Where to Stay in Lisbon

 

Moorish Castle/Castelo dos Mouros

This 10th century  Moorish castle was conquered by Afonso Henriques in 1147. On a fine day there are great views from the castle walls over the old town to Palácio Nacional da Pena and along the coast.

Sintra National Palace/Palácio Nacional de Sintra

Sintra’s national Palace has a fascinating mix of Moorish and Manueline architecture. Inside the lavishly decorated, whimiscally themed rooms are a delight to explore.

Quinta da Regaleira

Built between 1904 and 1910 this palace and its extensive gardens are full  of historical and religious references. The creation of eccentric millionaire António Augusta Carvalho Monteiro, in  the grounds there are secret passages and hidden tunnels. Sintra’s local government  reclaimed the site as a national monument in 1997 and opened it to the public shortly afterwards.

Palace and Park of Monserrate/ Parque e Palácio de Monserrate

Designed by  Sir Francis Cook, who built a fantastic Moorish-style palace and transformed the gardens with a sweeping lawn, camellias and subtropical trees from all over the world. Although the palace of Pena is the star attraction in Sintra this was our favourite.

 

Organised Sintra Tour

If you don’t like queuing for public transport then it is well worth considering an organised tour. There are many organised Lisbon tours to Sintra. You’ll find a selection for the best Sintra tours here.

Where to Stay in Sintra

Most tourists visit Sintra as a day trip, but if you plan to spend two or three day exploring it might be worth your while staying locally. Below are our picks of the best accommodation in Sintra so you don’t have to waste time searching.

Quinta das Murtas

Charming 19th century manor house set within peaceful gardens, less than 10 minutes walk to the town centre. Accommodation is in rooms and apartments making it ideal for family stays. There is a lovely outdoor pool and sun terrace where you can relax or enjoy a swim after a day exploring the sights. On-site car parking is available, a real bonus in Sintra.

Click here to see latest prices

Águamel Sintra

Located in Sintra town close to shops and restaurants. This family- run boutique guest house is set in renovated 19th century building. Inside the rooms are modern and comfortable and the service is friendly.

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Casa do Valle

Just a short walking distance from the town centre. Casa do Valle is set in the middle of vast gardens with lovely views to the mountains and palaces. There are 11 rooms on the property, a guest kitchen, swimming pool and a bbq area.

To check latest prices click here

Villa Alba

Modern, spacious apartments in a central location,  5 minutes walk from Sintra train station near plenty of restaurants, shops and buses. There is free parking available nearby and the owners run a café where they make their own homemade ice cream downstairs.

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Sintra Restaurants

There are a wide selection of restaurants. and cafés in Sintra. Restautante Dom Pipas tucked away behind the train station is a great place for a meal away from the hussle and bussle of the centre. They serve traditional Portuguese food in a relaxed, rustic atmosphere. At Tascantiga Tapas and Wine, you’ll be able to sample  a wide variety of Portuguese petiscos/ tapas with an original twist. In traditional tapas style the plates are small and good for sharing , but still a decent portion. They also have a kids menu. Antiga Fabrica das Verdadeiras Queijadas da Sapa  is the place to try the famous queijada from Sintra, a  small sweet cake made using requeijāo (a fresh cheese). Café Saudade is  a lovely old café in the centre of Sintra serving snacks and light meals.

 

If you are not visiting Sintra as part of an organised tour it is worth purchasing a good guidebook so you can discover more about the history and  plan your trip.

Have we inspired you to visit Sintra? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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Comments

  • Comment by shakil — June 16, 2019 @ 10:08 am

    Oh my gosh, so many interesting facts here. wow, such a stunning place & you photograph it so well. Thanks for the creative post!

  • Comment by Susan Connolly — June 17, 2019 @ 9:28 am

    Hi Shakil, thanks for your comment. Yes Sintra is a really interesting place to visit. Paulo took the photos on our recent visit, glad you like them.

  • Comment by Anahita Irani — June 26, 2019 @ 9:29 am

    Very informative post. Images speak louder than words. Thanks for sharing

  • Comment by Susan Connolly — June 26, 2019 @ 10:54 am

    Hi Anahita, Glad you found it helpful. Hope it encourages you to visit Sintra and if you do be sure to come back and tell us your thoughts.

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